Government resource

Patient and family experiences matter; addressing and learning from their concerns is essential for us at Fraser Health.

We understand how complex the health care system can be to navigate and we want to ensure you have access to the information and support you need to help your constituents. This webpage includes commonly asked questions on Fraser Health care services and processes.

Our hope is that by working together with MLA we can improve patient care and resolve concerns whenever possible. 

Home health

  • What are home support services and how does a constituent get them?

    Home support services are set-up by our Home Health program and are designed to support an individual's independence whether the services are provided in the home, in clinics, or in community settings. The type and amount of service depends on each client's individual care needs.

    What is Home Support, and what’s included?

    The term 'Home Support' refers to specific activities Community Health Workers perform with, or for, clients. These activities focus on helping people who have difficulty managing activities of daily living such as bathing, grooming, toileting, transferring, eating, and dressing. Home Support services are intended to supplement, rather than replace, the care and support provided by families or other community resources.

    When a client requests support that is not provided within the Ministry of Health’s Home Support Guidelines (for instance, vacuuming or grocery shopping), community resources such as Better at Home are provided for the client to pursue as options.

    How to get Home Support

    • People in the community: If a constituent is interested in receiving Home Support services, their best course of action is to connect with our Home Health Service Line. The Home Health Service Line is the best way to get more information on at-home and community services, and is the way to enquire about receiving Home Support services. More information can be found on the Home and Community Care webpage. The Home Health Service Line will be able to answer any questions they may have and be able to connect them with more resources if needed. The phone number for the Home Health Service Line is 1-855-412-2121, and is available 7 days a week, from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    • Patients in hospital: The hospital’s Quick Response Professional (in the Emergency Department) and/or Home Health Liaisons (throughout the hospital) are involved in referral to our Home Health program to help set-up home support services while a patient is hospital. If a patient is discharged from hospital with short-term home support services, a team member from the local Home Health office will follow-up with the client to see if long-term support needs to be set-up.

    • Case management: Once a constituent is connected to home support they are assigned a case manager. Case managers coordinate care for people with complex health needs requiring extra, ongoing support to live at home independently. Their goal is to help people live at home safely and avoid unnecessary or premature admission to a hospital or care facility.

    Home support care plans

    Home Health professionals conduct a comprehensive assessment with the constituent to see if they require and are eligible for home support services. If they are eligible, the team will work with the constituent (and/or their support system) to develop an individualized plan of care. The goals of a comprehensive care plan are to assist clients to remain at home safely for as long as possible, avoid unnecessary or premature admission to hospital or a care facility, support clients’ caregivers, and promote optimal independence and function. 

    Some home and community care services are provided free of charge. Others include a fee, which is determined by an individual’s after-tax income. Home Health staff work with individuals to determine what services and potential fees apply to them. 

    Concern resolution and enquiries

    If at any time a client has questions or concerns about their Home Support services, or would like to enquire about reassessment due to a change in their care needs, their best course of action is to connect directly with their case manager by calling their local Home Health office.

    For constituents who are not currently receiving Home Support (or were at one time, but no longer are), it is best for them to contact the Home Health Service Line at 1-855-412-2121.

  • What happens when a constituent needing home health services is sent home from a Fraser Health hospital to live in another region? 

    If a patient living in another health authority is in a Fraser Health hospital and upon discharge requires home health or home support, the care team at the hospital will connect with the home health team in the patient’s community to arrange services within the health authority they reside. 

  • Can a constituent get funding for home support that they arrange privately?

    Yes, some individuals with high and long-term care needs can get funding through the Choice in Supports for Independent Living (CSIL) program. Choice in Supports for Independent Living is a self-directed option for eligible home support clients. Choice in Supports for Independent Living clients receive funds directly from Fraser Health to purchase their own home support services, and as such, become employers who manage all aspects of their home support from hiring and supervising staff to overseeing how Choice in Supports for Independent Living funds are spent.

    Why explore Choice in Supports for Independent Living eligibility?

    Sometimes, as physical care needs become more complex and intense, it can be beneficial to have consistent care workers who are both familiar and trained to meet the client’s unique care. This also provides the client with a greater degree of control and direction in their care.

    Eligibility

    Choice in Supports for Independent Living enrollment has a strict criteria for eligibility and because of this, Choice in Supports for Independent Living is not appropriate for many home and community care clients. 

    In addition to meeting the general eligibility criteria for home and community care services, a client may be eligible for Choice in Supports for Independent Living if they:

    • Have been assessed as requiring home support services as part of their care plan;
    • Have a physical disability and high-intensity care needs;
    • Have assessed needs that can be met within Choice in Supports for Independent Living, within available resources;
    • Have agreed to pay the assessed client rate; and
    • Can safely coordinate and manage Choice in Supports for Independent Living services or have a client support group or a Choice in Supports for Independent Living representative acting as a Choice in Supports for Independent Living employer.

    Learn more about Choice in Supports for Independent Living eligibility criteria on the Ministry of Health website

    Access

    To enquire about Choice in Supports for Independent Living and other home support options, new clients can connect with the Home Health Service Line at 1-855-412-2121. If they are an existing client, they can speak with their Community Care Professional at their local home health office

  • How does a constituent get an assessment from an occupational therapist or physical therapist?

    Occupational therapist (OT) or physical therapist (PT) services can be accessed privately at a cost or through a community Home Health office.

    • If the constituent is not a home health client, they can set-up services including an assessment by calling the Home Health Service Line at 1-855-412-2121.
    • If the constituent is already a home health client, they can request their Community Care Professional or Home Care Nurse request an OT/PT assessment through the OT/PT in the Home Health Office. The nature of the client’s request will indicate if an OT or PT is needed for the assessment.

    The OT/PT will set-up a time with the constituent to provide the assessment to determine the constituent’s mobility needs and what type of support is needed. This appointment generally takes around 1.5 hours.

    Client OT/PT assessments are prioritized based on the client’s care needs so clients requiring more urgent support will be seen first while others may need to wait. 

  • How does a constituent get a subsidized wheelchair, walker, scooter, or other equipment?

    Fraser Health does not provide funding support for wheelchairs, walkers, scooters or other equipment. Funding support is available for a wheelchair or other equipment through the Health Assistance Branch of the Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction (SDPR). To be considered, a constituent must:

    Successfully complete an application for Person with Disability with the Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction (SDPR); or
    Be a person with persistent multiple barriers.

    To learn more about these requirements please visit the Social Development and Poverty Reduction website or call 1-866-866-0800.

    The Social Development and Poverty Reduction requires medical justification identifying why the medical equipment is medically essential. This justification must be completed by a qualified professional – usually an Occupational Therapist (OT) or Physical Therapist (PT). The constituent must also have a prescription from a medical doctor.

    The OT or PT service can be accessed privately at a cost or through a community Home Health office.

    • If the constituent is not a home health client, they can set-up services, including an assessment by calling the Home Health Service Line at 1-855-412-2121.
    • If the constituent is already a home health client, they can speak to their Community Care Professional or Home Care Nurse about requesting an OT/PT assessment through the OT/PT in the Home Health Office. The client’s request will determine whether an OT or PT is needed for the assessment.

    Client OT/PT assessments are prioritized based on the client’s care needs so clients requiring more urgent support will be seen first while others may need to wait.

    The OT/PT will set-up a time with the constituent to provide the assessment to determine the constituent’s mobility needs and what type of support is needed. This appointment generally takes around 1.5 hours.

    Upon assessment for equipment needs, the constituent will then choose a medical equipment vendor from a list of contracted vendors identified by Social Development and Poverty Reduction.  If equipment details are required the OT/PT will contact the vendor to discuss options. If necessary, the OT/PT will coordinate trials necessary to identify the best equipment features to address the needs and goals of the constituent. For some this may be just one trial, for others with more complex needs, it could be three or more.

    Once the equipment prototype is selected, the following is completed:

    • The OT/PT and the constituent complete a Medical Equipment Request and Justification form (for equipment over $500 only).
    • The OT/PT will complete a written summary of the client’s needs and how the selected equipment meets those needs.
    • The vendor provides a detailed quote.
    • This package of information is submitted by the OT/PT to the Health Assistance Branch of SDPR for their approval for funding.
    • Social Development and Poverty Reduction will inform the client, OT/PT and the vendor if funding is approved or denied.
      • If approved, the OT/PT will coordinate with the client and supplier for the delivery and set-up of the equipment.
      • If denied, the client will receive written notification from SDPR with instructions on how they can appeal the decision.

    The timeframe for this process to take place will fluctuate based on the client’s needs and complexity of the care assessment, trial(s) and funding assessment.

Residential care and assisted living

  • How do you get a subsidized residential care or assisted living bed?

    Constituents can set-up an assessment for residential care and assisted living placement by calling the Home Health Service Line at 1-855-412-2121 or by speaking with their Community Care Professional. If the constituent is in hospital, their care team will support the assessment.

    To manage timely access to both short-term and long-term services, the BC Ministry of Health’s Home and Community Care Policy (chapter 6) requires each health authority to have a policy that:

    • Gives priority for services to clients who have been assessed as having the highest care needs and/or the highest levels of risk, and
    • Determines which clients will have priority for admission to an available residential care bed, where assessment of needs and urgency are equal.

    More information about these requirements can be found in the Home and Community Care Policy.

    To meet this requirement, Fraser Health has a First Appropriate Bed policy. To ensure timely access to care, those seeking residential care facility are expected to accept the first bed offered to them. While every effort is made to offer the client a bed in their preferred facility, this may mean the client will receive placement in a residence that was not their first choice.

    If a constituent does not accept the first appropriate bed that meets their care need, Fraser Health will presume their needs are not urgent and move their name off the residential care access list. The constituent will then have the option to seek a private care facility or may be eligible for home support and other community resources. If the client is in hospital and does not accept placement, they will need to make arrangements for their immediate discharge from hospital.

    Interfacility transfer

    If a constituent does not receive their preferred facility, once they have moved into the first available facility they can request a transfer to a facility of their choice as long as that facility meets their care needs.  The process for an interfacility transfer differs if the constituent is currently at a facility contracted or owned and operated by Fraser Health.

    • Contracted site: The constituent or their family would connect with the Residential Care Liaison or the site’s Director of Care to assist them with paperwork to begin the process.
    • Owned and operated site: The constituent or their family would connect with the Residential Care Liaison or social worker to assist them with paperwork.

    Our directory can help determine if a residential care facility is contracted or owned and operated by Fraser Health.

    Once the paperwork is complete, the application is then sent to the Fraser Health Community Access office for processing. The Fraser Health Community Access office can be reached at 604-519-8500.

    Transfers from Fraser Health to another health authority

    A transfer request from a Fraser Health or contracted facility to another health authority is processed in the same way as an interfacility transfer within Fraser Health. However, the application is sent to the receiving health authority, not the Fraser Health Community Access office.

    Transfers from other health authorities to Fraser Health

    Clients in other authorities wanting to move into Fraser Health will need to have their paperwork completed and sent to the Fraser Health Community Access office. The Residential Care Liaisons, Directors of Care, or social workers of their current residence will be able to assist with this process. 

    First Appropriate Bed policy and interfacility transfers

    The First Appropriate Bed Policy does not apply for transfers between facilities unless the care needs of the client warrant a move. For example, if the client now requires a special care unit and the site where they are currently reside at does not have one, the client would be relocated to an appropriate facility while following the First Appropriate Bed policy.

  • What happens when a constituent is in hospital and needs to go to residential care or assisted living?

    If a patient is in a Fraser Health hospital and upon discharge requires residential care or assisted living, the care team at the hospital will connect with our Community Access team who will find a suitable placement within the constituent’s preferred community, according to the First Appropriate Bed Policy.

    If a patient living in another health authority’s region is in a Fraser Health hospital and upon discharge requires residential care or assisted living, the care team at the hospital will connect with our Community Access team who will in turn connect with the Access team of the patient’s home health authority. The Access teams will then arrange for placement into a facility within the jurisdiction of the patient’s home health authority.

Hospital services

  • Why would a surgery be postponed?

    Surgeons and anesthesiologists prioritize their surgeries based on the care required for their patients. Sometimes this means that a patient's surgery will be postponed in order to accommodate someone requiring more urgent care.

    Surgeons have privileges at hospitals and are allocated a certain amount of time in the operating room each week. Within their scheduled OR time, they prioritize their patients to meet the urgency of their care needs.

    If a patient feels they need to be treated more urgently, their best option is to speak with his or her surgeon. Together they will best be able to ensure that the surgery is prioritized appropriately to meet their care needs.

  • Who should a constituent speak with regarding a care plan?

    If a patient, resident, or family member would like to discuss their care plan, it is best to bring this to the attention of the Patient Care Coordinator (in hospital) or Director of Care (in residential care) as they will be able to advise and coordinate meetings with other members of the care team, including management, as needed.

    In consultation with the patient and family, the care team will work to fulfill the plan and ensure appropriate supports and services are in place when the patient leaves the hospital, such as home support. Care plans vary from patient to patient as they reflect individual care needs, support and home environment.

  • How can you access test results post-discharge?

    Patients can request test results and their health records from the Health Records department of the hospital where they received care. The records can be paper based, electronically generated or a combination of both. Learn more about the Health Records process.

    Additionally, if a patient’s family physician has hospital privileges their physician can access the patient’s reports via Meditech, one of Fraser Health’s health information systems. The patient can connect with their family physician’s office to enquire about this option. 

  • Who should a patient or their family speak with if they are opposed to hospital discharge?

    When someone enters hospital to receive care, our goal is to provide them with the best care possible so that they are medically stable and can return home or into assisted living or residential care services.

    Discharge plans for each patient are established by the care team, including the physician or hospitalist, patient care coordinator, nurses and specialists (if needed). In consultation with the patient and family, the care team will work to fulfill the plan and ensure appropriate supports and services (such as home health support for bathing) are in place for when the patient leaves the hospital. Discharge plans vary from patient to patient as they reflect individual care needs, support and home environment.

    When a patient and/or their family do not agree with the timing for discharge from hospital, it is best to bring this to the attention of the Patient Care Coordinator as they will be able to advise and coordinate meetings with other members of the care team, including management, as is needed.

Mental health and substance use

  • How do you access detox or rehab services?

    Referrals for substance use can be obtained in a few different ways:

    • B.C. Alcohol and Drug Information and Referral Service - This service is available to people across B.C. needing help with any kind of substance abuse issues 24 hours a day. It provides information and referral to education, prevention and treatment services and regulatory agencies. Constituents can call 1-800-663-1441, toll-free, for information.

    • Mental Health and Substance Use Centres – A constituent’s local Mental Health and Substance Use Centre can connect them to substance use services and resources. Find contact information for Mental Health and Substance Use Centres in Fraser Health.

    • Family physician – Family physicians can also refer the constituent to substance use services. To enquire, the constituent can connect with their family physician.

  • How does someone get certified under the Mental Health Act?

    People with a mental illness have a right to seek or refuse service. The only way we can compel someone to accept treatment is if they are certified under the Mental Health Act. There are very stringent guidelines associated with certification.

    • An individual’s mental health decline must pose a threat not only to themselves but also to others.
    • Two physicians have to sign off under the Mental Health Act to ensure the proper care is provided.
    • A person can also be certified through police intervention and through an order by a judge.

    If someone does not meet these stringent guidelines, we cannot compel them to accept treatment but, when they are willing, they can contact their local mental health office for support.

  • How can someone access child and youth mental health support?

    Child and youth mental health support in the community is provided through the Ministry of Children and Family Development.  However, Fraser Health supports child and youth mental health through a range of services in urgent, crisis, and acute situations, including short-term crisis intervention, assessment and treatment, and inpatient assessment and treatment planning.  Supports include:

    Short Term Assessment, Response and Treatment (START) team

    The START team provides urgent mental health assessment and crisis intervention for children and teens aged 6-18 years old experiencing a mental health crisis. Referrals can be made by parents, doctors, teachers and others by calling 1 844 782-7811 (1-844-START11) Monday to Friday between 9am and 9pm and on weekends and holidays between noon and 9pm.

    Early Psychosis Intervention Program

    The Early Psychosis Intervention program is a collaborative initiative between Fraser Health and Ministry of Children and Family Development, Child and Youth Mental Health.  The goal of the EPI program is to recognize the signs and symptoms of psychosis early so that effective treatment can be started as soon as possible. The program provides much-needed clinical services and education intended to promote wellness, reduce socially isolating behaviour and restore previous levels of functioning. 

    Visit www.earlypsychosis.ca for resources and information on the EPI program.

    Adolescent Day Treatment Program (ADTP) 

    The Adolescent Day Treatment Program (ADTP) is a community based multidisciplinary outpatient program serving adolescents aged 13-18 years who have an acute psychiatric illness. ADTP was established in 1995 to support youth whose mental health symptoms were affecting their ability to function in school and their community. The youth attend ADTP for 6 months with 4 months of follow up outreach support. ADTP has 18-20 youth attend the program 4 days a week from 8:45 AM – 3:00 PM.

    Components of the programming include: school, cognitive behavioural group, coping skills group, life skills training, exposure group, transit training, gym at two different community locations, other recreation and leisure opportunities, individual counselling, family therapy, and meetings with community and family supports. Whenever possible, we encourage community program utilization (i.e., recreation centres, drop in programs, public transport) in order to promote independence, socialization and healthy lifestyle choices.

    Adolescent Day Treatment Program referrals are provided primarily through community mental health services with the Ministry of Children and Family Development, and also through the Adolescent Psychiatry Unit and BC Children’s Hospital.

    Adolescent Psychiatry Unit (APU)

    The Adolescent Psychiatry Unit (APU) is a 10 bed inpatient unit that provides assessment and stabilization for youth ages 12-17 who are experiencing psychiatric illness. It is one component of the network of mental health services for adolescents in Fraser Health. The multidisciplinary treatment team consists of child psychiatrists, psychologist, nurses, social workers, occupational therapist, recreation therapist, and youth care counsellors.

    The program goals are to:

    • Provide a safe, structured environment designed to meet the individual therapeutic needs of all youth admitted to the unit.
    • Provide assessment, stabilization, initiation of treatment and discharge recommendations for youth requiring hospitalization for psychiatric illness. Average length of stay is 2-4 weeks.
    • Provide family support and education regarding adolescent development and the emergence of psychiatric disorders.
    • Facilitate liaison to community resources within Fraser Health, and Child and Youth Mental Health within the Ministry of Children and Family Development.

    Referrals to the APU are provided through community mental health services with the Ministry of Children and Family Development and through hospitals. 

    Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatry Clinics

    The outpatient clinics consist of the General Teaching Clinic, Infant Psychiatry Clinic, and Neuropsychiatry Clinic. The clinics provide psychiatric and psychosocial assessment and short-term intervention for children and youth with a broad range of mental health concerns. Neuropsychiatry and General Teaching clinics are for children and youth from ages 6 to 18 years of age. The infant psychiatry clinic serves children up to 5 years of age. Clinics are staffed by clinicians, psychiatrists and psychiatric residents.

    Outpatient clinics can be accessed through physician (General Practitioners or Specialists) referral.

    Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Stabilization Unit (CAPSU)

    CAPSU serves young people from across the Fraser Health region, aged six to 17, who need a five- to seven-day stay in hospital for stabilization. Located in Surrey Memorial Hospital, this regional service is a 10-bed unit with a specialized care team that includes psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, social workers, occupational therapists and youth care counsellors. CAPSU has the Snoezelen™ Room, a multi-sensory environment used to help reduce agitation and anxiety and stimulate and encourage communication, the first of its kind for children and youth in a hospital psychiatric unit in Canada.

    Patients are connected with CAPSU when they come to their emergency department and are assessed to require this level of service.

  • Are private recovery homes licensed by Fraser Health?

    A license is required if a facility is providing three or more prescribed services to three or more clients in care, who are not related by blood or marriage to the care provider.

    Prescribed services include:

    • Regular assistance with activities of daily living, including eating, mobility, dressing, grooming, bathing or personal hygiene;
    • Central storage of medication, distribution of medication, administering medication or monitoring the taking of medication;
    • Maintenance or management of the cash resources or other property of a resident or person in care;
    • Monitoring of food intake or of adherence to therapeutic diets;
    • Structured behaviour management and intervention; and,
    • Psychosocial rehabilitative therapy or intensive physical rehabilitative therapy.

    To see if a facility is licensed or share a concern about a licensed establishment, constituents can call their local Community Care Facilities Licensing team.

    Sometimes it may appear like the establishment should be licensed when instead it is supportive housing and therefore considered a private establishment and outside of Fraser Health’s legislative authority. Supportive housing is for adults who need some assistance in order to continue to live independently and services include 24-hour response, light housekeeping, meals, and social and recreational activities.

    If a facility is providing‎ one or two prescribed services, it would fit the Assisted Living model and can be registered as an Assisted Living facility with the provincial Assisted Living Registry. Assisted living establishments provide housing, hospitality services and personal care services for adults who can live independently and make decisions on their own behalf but require a supportive environment due to physical and functional health challenges.

Other

  • How are non-residents or uninsured residents billed for hospital services?

    Fraser Health is required to collect fees for medical treatment provided to non-residents of Canada and uninsured residents. Fees are determined by British Columbia’s Ministry of Health.

    Charges include general hospital fees as well as diagnostic testing, such as CT scans, MRIs and other high cost procedures. Hospital fees do not include subsequent visits or Emergency Department doctor  fees. Physicians’ fees will be billed separately to the patient by the physician’s office.

    Non-resident rates vs. Uninsured resident rates

    • Non-residents of Canada are charged non-resident rates, which are payable on admission or discharge. These rates are for those who are:
      • From out-of-country
      • Were unable to provide proof of valid residency status (such as landed immigration papers or permanent residency card, student or work visas)
      • A refugee claimant without valid Interim Federal Health Coverage on the date of service, and/or
      • A visiting Canadian and not a permanent resident of Canada (including temporary residents).
    • Uninsured residents of Canada are charged uninsured resident rates, which are payable on admission or discharge. These rates are for residents who are:
      • Without B.C. medical coverage or valid medical coverage from another province
      • A returning Canadian during the waiting period of 3 months for BC medical coverage, or
      • Are a non-Canadian resident with proof of valid residency status (such as landed immigration papers or permanent residency card, student or work visas).

    Emergency services

    If a patient presents at an Emergency Department and they do not have valid enrolment in the provincial Medical Services Plan program, they will be asked for payment during registration. However, they will not be refused service or treatment if they are unable to pay.

    Community, diagnostic, and elective surgery services

    Non-residents of B.C. are not eligible for publicly-funded services such as lab diagnostic procedures, medical imaging, elective procedures, outpatient clinics, or Home Health / Home Support services through a Fraser Health Home Health office. They will be required to pay upfront and may be refused services if unable to pay.

    Private insurance

    Patients who carry private insurance are required to provide information to the registration staff at time of admission. Hospital and physician fees remain the responsibility of the patient. Insurance companies are not sent copies of bills for outpatient visits and all charges are payable at time of service. For concerns regarding private insurance, patients should contact their insurer directly.

    How to make payment

    Accounts can be settled at the hospital’s Cashier’s Office or by connecting with our Patient Accounts Department at 604-520-4860.

  • How do you access health records?

    Everyone treated at one of our facilities has a health record. These records contain documents such as reports from care providers, test results, treatments, and pharmacy information. Health records can be paper based, electronically generated or a combination of both. Only authorized legal representatives can request the health records of a patient, living or deceased.

    Process

    An authorized legal representative can request access to, or copies of, a patient’s health record by:

    Concern resolution and enquiries

    For any questions or concerns, it is best to connect with the hospital or locations Health Record department directly to clarify what type of information may be provided. A copy of the Fraser Health Health Records policy can be found online.

  • How do you access test results after you are discharged from hospital?

    Patients can request test results and their health records from the Health Records department of the hospital where they received care. The records can be paper based, electronically generated or a combination of both. Learn more about the Health Records process.

    Additionally, if a patient’s family physician has hospital privileges their physician can access the patient’s reports via Meditech, one of Fraser Health’s health information systems. The patient can connect with their family physician’s office to enquire about this option.

  • Where can you share a complaint about a daycare? 

    Licensed child care facilities, including day cares, provide a range of child care options for children from birth to 12 years of age.

    Our licensing staff have the legal responsibility to investigate all complaints that a licensed care facility is not complying with the Community Care and Assisted Living Act (CCALA), the regulations or the terms and conditions of its license, and to investigate all complaints that a person may be operating an illegal child care facility that requires a license (e.g. providing care to 3 or more children who are not related to the operator by blood or marriage.  

    If a constituent has a health and safety concern or complaint about a licensed child care facility or illegal unlicensed child care (three or more children not related to the operator by blood or marriage), their first course of action is to contact their local Community Care Facilities Licensing Office.

    Some commonly asked questions regarding complaints and the process followed can be found at child care complaints and investigation webpage.

  • Who can someone speak with if they lost personal items (dentures, hearing aid etc.) at the hospital?

    Fraser Heath does not assume responsibility for the personal belongings of patients. Claims for lost, stolen or damaged patient property are investigated to determine whether there is liability on the part of the health authority.  If the health authority is found to be negligent, we will endeavour to settle the claim in accordance with standard insurance principles.

    • If a constituent finds that a personal item has gone missing or been damaged, please speak with the Patient Care Coordinator (PCC) or Manager of the unit where the loss/damage occurred to notify them and see if it can be found.
    • If the item cannot be found the Manager/PCC will report the loss/damage, Integrated Risk Management (IRM) will be auto-notified and follow up with the constituent.
    • The constituent can also connect with IRM at 604.587.7862.
    • The constituent will be asked to provide the following information:
      • Description/photo of the item/appraisal or proof of value.
      • Description of how the loss/damage occurred.
      • Whether or not the lost/damaged item is covered under the constituent’s home insurance.