immunization child and youth

As children get older, their protection from infant immunizations can wear off. They can also be at risk of new diseases.

As children get older, the protection from infant immunizations can wear off. Children can also be at risk of new diseases as they enter their pre-teen and teen years.

Free routine vaccinations

Routine school-age immunizations are free.

What immunizations does my child need if we are new to Canada?

Immunizations schedules are often different from country to country. As a New Canadian there may be free vaccines that your child needs. Talk with your doctor or a public health nurse unit to find out what vaccines your child may be missing.

What vaccines does my child need if they have a chronic health condition?

Different chronic health conditions can put your child at risk for different vaccine preventable diseases. Talk with your doctor or a public health nurse to find out what vaccines your child may need.

Kindergarten, starting at 4 years of age

To provide the best protection possible, we recommend that your child be immunized before they enter kindergarten.

For an immunization appointment contact your family doctor, local pharmacist (for those 5 years of age and older), or Public Health.

Are my child's immunizations up to date for kindergarten?

The following vaccines are free for kindergarten age children, starting at age four:

  • Tdap-IPV (or approved product): protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio.
  • MMRV: protects against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chicken pox).

Where can I get my child immunized?

The Tdap-IPV (or approved product) and MMRV vaccines are free and can be provided by your:

  • Family doctor
  • Pharmacist (for children 5 years of age and older)
  • Public health nurse

To book an immunization appointment with Public Health:

Residents of Fraser East (Mission, Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Agassiz and Hope), call 604-702-4906 or 604-702-4840

Residents in any other area of Fraser Health, call 604-476-7087 

Hours of operation: Monday to Friday (8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.)

Note: When making an appointment with Public Health, you will be offered a text message reminder through the ImmunizeBC text message reminder system. 

Does my child need immunizations to attend kindergarten?

  • Immunization of school-aged children is not mandatory in B.C. at this time, however, it is strongly recommended before school entry.
  • If someone at school has a vaccine-preventable disease, children who are unprotected (not immunized) may be asked to stay home until it is safe to return.
    Some children can not be immunized against certain diseases because of medical conditions. If other non-immunized children bring disease into a school, it can be serious and even deadly for those children.
  • Your child could get seriously ill if a vaccine-preventable disease, such as mumps or measles, circulates in a school or community and they do not have immunity. Vaccines are safe and are your child's best protection. You can learn more about vaccine safety and myths about vaccines.

Grade 6 and 9

Students in grade 6 and 9 are immunized by public health nurses at school.

Information and consent forms for grade 6 and grade 9 will be sent home at the beginning of the school year. Please complete, sign and return the consent form to your child’s school.

It is recommended and encouraged that parents/guardians discuss consent for immunization with  their children.

B.C.s’ legislated Infant’s Act states that children under the age of 19, can provide consent for health care if the health care provider determines that the child is capable of making this decision. This is called mature minor consent and includes providing consent for immunizations.

Although there is no set age when a child can give mature minor consent for immunizations, in most circumstances public health nurses in B.C. will get consent from the parents/guardians of children in grade 6. However, public health nurses in B.C. will offer mature minor consent as an option for grade 9 students who are able to understand the benefits and possible reactions (side effects) for each vaccine and the risk of not getting immunized.

How can I get my child's immunization records?

Learn how to get a copy of your child's immunization records.

Keep track

Keep your child’s immunization record in a safe place. They may need it later for school, to travel to other countries or to take to hospital in case of an emergency.

If your child’s immunization record is lost, contact Public Health for a copy of their records and record it on an immunization card.

Know what's next on your vaccine schedule by:

Resources