Woman sitting on slide holding picture frame with caption "Why immunize? Hug my grandkids"
Submitted by Communications & Public Affairs

"For me, the most important thing was protecting the residents – even over myself – to make sure they were safe because they are the most vulnerable.”

“For me, the most important thing was protecting the residents – even over myself – to make sure they were safe because they are the most vulnerable.

Getting [the vaccine] just lowers my risk of picking it up and bringing it into them, and causing an outbreak. I didn't want to risk ever picking anything up and taking it to work. We’re extra diligent in our long term care home about keeping distanced from everyone. Hopefully, once people get vaccinated, we’ll be able to open up and get more visitors coming in.

The number one issue for them is that longing for personal touch. Now, they have visitors that can come in with their masks on. While they can hug, they still don’t get to see the smiles from their families. Sometimes they don’t even recognize them with their masks on. 

I have eight grandchildren and I haven't been hugged by them in close to a year now. Four of them live in Texas. We need to get people vaccinated so things can open up. Even my grandchildren that live locally...I mean, we go and sit six feet apart in the park or something, briefly. But you really long to hug them and have them for a sleepover. You can't even have them to your house. It was the saddest Christmas ever this past year.

I had no reactions to the vaccine. I was just game for it.

I feel better about myself. I feel safer knowing I’ve got it. My coworkers, all of us have gotten it, so we feel like things are getting better. Maybe soon we can do a summer barbecue.”

Not vaccinated yet? Eligible health care workers can book their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine by calling the provincial call centre at 1-833-838-2323.


comments powered by Disqus
Text Size
A
A

Rate this article


Current rating: 0 (0 ratings) No rating yet, be the first to rate it!